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Royal Wootton Bassett


   A Christian presence at the heart of the community for over 750 years.



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SAFEGUARDING

Here at St Bartholomew and All Saints Church we take our responsibilities surrounding the safeguarding of children, young people, and adults who may be at risk very seriously.

Our Parish Safeguarding Policy can be downloaded [here]

If you have any Safeguarding questions or concerns you can contact our Parish Safeguarding Officer, Geoffrey Woodhouse, on 01793 854143

Alternatively you can contact the Diocesan Safeguarding Adviser on 07500 664800 or email heather.bland@salisbury.anglican.org

Parish Office: 01793 853272


Open Tues, Wed & Fri 0930-1200

Please leave a message at other times






 1 Church Street

Royal Wootton  Bassett

Wiltshire

SN4 7BQ





Vicar of Royal Wootton Bassett

Reverend Jane Curtis

01793 977395





Assistant Curate

Reverend Oliver Blease

01793 855756



























Sabbath Rest


August is traditionally the month of ‘down-time’ in the Church of England, when the clergy are perhaps sunning themselves in the Costa-del-Coffee or wherever, and occasionally writing into their diary ‘on a course’, not mentioning that the course in question has eighteen holes and a clubhouse at the end of it.

And this has me thinking about the call to Sabbath rest in the bible. Rather than simply ‘a bit of time off’, in Genesis God actually makes rest into something holy: “God blessed the seventh day and hallowed it, because on it God rested from all the work that he had done” (Gen 2:3). When the Israelites are gathering bread from heaven and walking in the wilderness they are told to rest one day each week (Ex 16:26; 29). Indeed Sabbath is so important that it even makes it into the Ten Commandments, in at number four (Ex 20:8-11). It is also mentioned in many of the prophets: Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel for example.


Sister Madonna Bruder, a Roman Catholic nun in the US, is known as the ‘Iron Nun’ – at the age of 86 she still completes Ironman Triathlon events (in one day: a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride and a 26.2 mile run!). Now we can’t all be Sister Madonna, but she’s definitely found the thing which gives her joy and in a sense ‘rest’ from her daily tasks of work and prayer. (Her autobiography is wonderfully titled ‘The Grace to Race’!).




Leaving heart-racing sporting achievements aside, perhaps we can commit to deciding how we can personally follow the command to Sabbath rest in the coming days and weeks. A minute’s prayer at a particular time each day and taking a moment to thank God for the good things we have received is a good place to start.


God has made us human and in need of occasional rest. It is good to rest together and with God, and to take stock of where we are, returning later to the harvest field with renewed energy and a joyful heart.




Rev. Ollie Blease

Even God needed a day off. And I commend this time to reflect on how we are being kind to ourselves and making time for Sabbath rest in our own lives. Rest need not be idleness or nothingness, but simply whatever ‘recharges our batteries’. I find reading, painting, exercise, and timEven God needed a day off. And I commend this time to reflect on how we are being kind to ourselves and making time for Sabbath rest in our own lives. Rest need not be idleness or nothingness, but simply whatever ‘recharges our batteries’. I find reading, painting, exercise, and time with loved ones all energise me to be a better minister in the parish than I would otherwise be. Jesus made time to be apart from others and to pray. And he made time to dine with his friends and share a good wine with them too.


Perhaps for some ‘a change is as good as a rest’ as they say. It can be just as helpful to break the regular processes of daily life once in a while and to try something new.

e with loved ones all energise me to be a better minister in the parish than I would otherwise be. Jesus made time to be apart from others and to pray. And he made time to dine with his friends and share a good wine with them too.


Perhaps for some ‘a change is as good as a rest’ as they say. It can be just as helpful to break the regular processes of daily life once in a while and to try something new.